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Trees for Food Security Project goal is to enhance food security for resource-poor people in rural Eastern Africa through research that supports national programmes to scale up the use of trees within farming systems in Ethiopia and Rwanda and then scale out successes to relevant ago-ecological zones in Uganda and Burundi.
Through the project, 5 Rural Resource Centers (2 in Rwanda, 2 Ethiopia and 1 in Uganda) and nurseries to enhance training and supply of improved tree germplasm have been established. The RRCs have provided business opportunities for farmer groups and unemployed youth particularly through grafted fruit trees.

Watch this video to learn more
Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/2awF9S3

Water scarcity is a critical constraint to Kenya’s socioeconomic development and its achievement of vision 2030.On 11 April 2017, the Government and partners from the development and business communities launched the Kenya chapter of the Billion Dollar Alliance for Rainwater Harvesting, a continent-wide, multi-actor alliance designed to scale up farm pond technology for agribusiness and livelihood resilience for dry land farming systems.Kenya’s rainwater potential is more than 350 billion cubic meters. If captured and managed, this water is enough to support a population of 233 million people.This partnership is led by World Forestry Center and World Food Program.The main goal of this partnership  is to increase farmers’ income and to improve food security. The partnership will provide technical, financial, policy and research support to the smallholder farmers.Impediments such as slow implementation and low technology adoption may hamper the realization of this process.However, the minister for water and irrigation reaffirmed the stakeholders of the government’s support in creating an enabling environment through proper policy implementation aimed at streamlining the government’s Water Sector and increase  access to clean water for all in adequate quantity and quality at an affordable price as envisaged in Vision 2030 and  the Constitution of Kenya.

Originally published onhttp://www.worldagroforestry.org/

 

 

 

Two billion people live in the drylands, which cover 41 percent of the world’s land area. Far from being bare and lifeless, these drylands contain trees and forests essential to the lives of people and animals, supplying basic needs such as food, medicine, wood, energy, and fodder for livestock.
But every minute, we lose 23 hectares of land to desertification.
Restoring these lands will return life to the soil and to the communities who know them best and depend on them for their livelihoods. As new trees and plants grow, transforming drylands into greener landscapes, they will help combat climate change, desertification and contribute to humanity’s efforts to save the planet.
Help raise awareness on the importance of the world’s dryland forests and the need for action towards their sustainable management and restoration by sharing this video.
#2billioncare
More information: http://www.fao.org/dryland-forestry/en/

Originally published by FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recently launched the  Water Productivity Open Access Portal (WaPOR) to monitor and report on agriculture water productivity over Africa and the Near East.

The tool has gone live, tapping satellite data to help farmers achieve reliable agricultural yields and optimized irrigation systems.

Additionally, productivity databases and underlying map layers  can easily be accessed by users.The tool allows direct data queries, time series analyses, area statistics and data download of key variables associated to water and land productivity assessments.

The tool’s  database sifts through satellite data and uses Google Earth computing power to produce maps that show how much biomass and yield is produced per cubic meter of water consumed. The maps can be rendered at resolutions of as little as 30 to 250 meters, and updated every one to ten days.

Click here for the full story.

Originally published on FAO Website.

“We’re at the forefront of understanding how we can make the most of soils to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere,” said Rolf Sommer, principal soil scientist.

Research shows that, small farms emit higher quantities of Green House Gas emissions(GHG) per calorie of food produced compared with larger ones this is because tilling the soil on a more regular basis, especially on smaller plots of land, accelerates the process of decomposing organic matter – required to move from net loss to net sinking

However, using the best management practices available  should boost farm productivity and efficiency without putting additional stress on farm resources, finances or workloads of men and women.Moreover,these practices  should be compatible with the realities of farmers.

It may take only little incentives for a farmer to adopt soil conservation practices that significantly reduce losses of carbon from soils.

As scientists work to beat climate change, 500 experts from around the world will discuss protecting the largest carbon store we have: soils,at the Global Symposium on Soil Organic Carbon (GSOC17) on  March 21st – 23rd.

Click here for the full story.

Originally published on CIAT Website.

A lot has happened since countries met in Paris in 2015 and agreed on an accord to combat climate change. So far, more than 140 countries have ratified or otherwise joined the Paris Agreement, representing more than 80 percent of global emissions. Several major economies, including Canada, Germany and Mexico, have also developed long-term plans to decarbonize their economies.

As countries implement their targets and policies and develop more detailed pathways to reduce their emissions, it’s important to fully understand our global emissions picture and how it has changed over time. WRI recently updated its CAIT Climate Data Explorer on the world’s top greenhouse gas-emitting countries with the latest global data available (2013). Here’s an interactive chart to explore it by country and by economic sector, showing how the top emitters have changed in recent years.

Originally published on the WRI website.

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